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What is fgm and where does it happen?

Between 100 million and 140 million women and girls are thought to be living with the consequences of female genital mutilation, according to the World Health Organisation.

FGM is defined by the WHO as “all procedures that involve partial or total removal of the external female genitalia, or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons”. It is recognised as a violation of the human rights of women and girls. In December 2012, the United Nations general assembly unanimously voted to work for the elimination of FGM throughout the world.

FGM is defined by the WHO as “all procedures that involve partial or total removal of the external female genitalia, or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons”. It is recognised as a violation of the human rights of women and girls. In December 2012, the United Nations general assembly unanimously voted to work for the elimination of FGM throughout the world.

“It reflects deep-rooted inequality between the sexes, and constitutes an extreme form of discrimination against women,” says the WHO. “It is nearly always carried out on minors and is a violation of the rights of children. The practice also violates a person’s rights to health, security and physical integrity, the right to be free from torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment, and the right to life when the procedure results in death.”

Just how many girls and women have been subjected to FGM is hard to know. The data is not easy to collect for obvious reasons. Last year Unicef published what it described as the most comprehensive compilation of data and analysis on the prevalence of FGM in Africa and the Middle East. Using more than 70 national surveys, produced over a period of more than 20 years, the report focused on the 29 countries where the practice is most common.

Leia mais The Guardian

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